The online diary of a gay courtesan.

Guest Writer: J.P. Barnaby (2 of 3), “If you don’t tell potential fans how great you are, who will?”

(In the spirit of providing useful information and a place for intelligent dialogue, www.DevonHunter.info accepts well written blog entries about topics of concern to adult entertainment. The views expressed in the following article are not necessarily shared by the operators of the hosting site. Archived guest writers’ articles will be listed under Interviews & Essays.)

“Establishing credibility and visibility go hand in hand and establishing both is critical to your success and your victory over competitors.” – MegaJoin Online Business Blog

If you don’t tell potential fans how great you are, who will?

Writing novels had once been a hobby for me before I made the decision to try to find a publisher. By day, I’m a quiet geeky software developer who loves Star Trek, techy gadgets, and my Xbox 360. In other words, I don’t get out much. When I began to open up my perversions to others and publish my work, I found that the most challenging thing for me was marketing myself. Unfortunately in order to share my wicked imagination with a larger group of people, it’s something that I just have to do.

As part of this post, I wanted to share with you a few very basic things that you can do to build an online presence and hopefully help someone in the industry trying to promote themselves to have an easier time of it. An online presence, even at its most basic, can tell your fans where to find your work. More expansive online activities can also allow you to connect with your fans, inspiring loyalty in a veritable sea of possibilities. As an example of what you can accomplish, I’ll offer up the site that I created for Logan Scott, Hard Friction’s first exclusive model – www.loganscottxxx.com.

This guide is a practical way to set up a basic web presence that’s automated and easy to maintain.

A domain name
The first thing that you need to do is register a domain name. This is the address on the internet where people will find you. I use GoDaddy for all of my domains, because they have an intuitive interface and they have package and comprehensive services. Decide what domain name you want to use, and make sure that it’s consistent across all of the services you’re going to use. For example, you don’t want a Twitter name that says TheBobSmith and a domain of BobSmithXXX – keep them consistent so that you’re easier to find.

Go to www.godaddy.com and look for your domain name to see if it’s been taken. On GoDaddy you can also see if your Twitter name is available. If they are both open, follow the instructions to register your domain. It’s just like buying anything else on the internet. Just enter the information they need and keep hitting “next” until you get to the payment screen. It’s about $10/year to register a domain.

Email
You want to have a way for people interested in your work to contact you – fans, review blogs, etc. The best way to do this is to set up a free email account so that you can give the address out freely and not have to worry about your personal account. I would keep managers, studios, etc. on your primary account because you’ll generally check that more frequently. Go to www.gmail.com and sign up for a new account. You’ll want to keep it as close to your domain/Twitter as possible. For example, if your Twitter name is BobSmithXXX, you can make your email BobSmithXXX@gmail and your domain www.BobSmithXXX.com.

Twitter
One of the fastest way to get information to, or to interact with, your friends and fellow models is on Twitter. Most smartphones have a Twitter application that can be installed, or you can use text messaging. You can also send tweets (Twitter messages) from your computer using any number of applications.

When you registered your domain name, you made sure that the Twitter name you wanted was open. Go to www.twitter.com to register a new account. Use the Gmail account to create the Twitter account, so that the spam from Twitter goes there rather than your normal account.

Blog
Blogspot is one of the easiest online blogging services to use. The templates are easy to implement, and the widgets make popping long term content into place pretty simple. Go to www.blogspot.com and log in with the Gmail account that you created. Create a new blog by following the steps in the wizard.

Facebook
There are two different kinds of Facebook pages that you can set up for yourself, a personal page and a fan page.
Go to www.facebook.com. If you already have a personal page, you can add a fan page at www.facebook.com/pages/create.php?campaign_id=372931622610&placement=pghm&extra_1=0.

TwitterFeed
Maintaining a blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc. can be time consuming. One great way to minimize the amount of time you spend getting information to your fans is to make your blog post new content on Facebook and Twitter for you. Go to www.twitterfeed.com and sign up for an account.

Next, add an RSS feed for your blog. The fastest way to find your RSS feed is to go to your blog and use the RSS button on the IE toolbar. Click on it, and you’ll see an option to subscribe to the blog. Copy the URL (that’s your RSS feed link). You can also use the RSS or Atom link on your blog. Paste your feed link into TwitterFeed and select Facebook. Log into Facebook and allow it to connect the link. Select Twitter and log into Twitter, allowing it to connect the link. Make a test blog post, then check Facebook and Twitter to confirm that it worked.

Setting up your online presence isn’t enough, however. Even more than the look and feel of your page, fresh dynamic content is essential so that your fans will subscribe and come back to see the new posts. These posts can be merely functional (such as new shoots that you’re doing and images from your recent releases), or they can be more personal (talking about what is important to you). You may think that your fans really are only interested in one or two of your physical assets, but you’d be surprised how many are just as interested in you as a person.

Wishing you a wonderfully productive new year,

– J. P. Barnaby
www.jpbarnaby.com
Twitter: @JPBarnaby

Erotic fiction is more than just moans, grunts, and physical pleasure. To J. P. Barnaby, erotic fiction consists not only of the mechanics of physical love, but the complex characters and relationships that lead to those all-encompassing feelings of need and longing. Sex without context is merely sex – but sex coupled with attraction, with explosive repercussions – that is good erotic fiction.

4 comments

1 Bob { 01.07.11 at 4:52 am }

J.P. – You have created a great resource. You brought together all the elements of technology in one place to establish “credibility and visibility” of one-self in a social network.

I agree with your use of the adjective “dynamic”. The resources are available, but what is done with them is equally, if not more, important to set a reasonably high level of credibility. The end product has to have energy, enthusiasm, and have a sense of purpose. Vigor and purpose are both needed to get things going and to get things done. Like “dynamics” in physics, the blog has to be active and producing or undergoing change over time.

Blogging is a creative skill.

Good piece of work. Look forward to your next installment.

2 J. P. Barnaby { 01.09.11 at 7:41 am }

Bob – Thank you. I was actually surprised at how much of a model’s publicity is of the “do-it-yourself” variety. I saw an article recently that talked about guys like Chris Porter and Devon whose entire popularity was gained by self-promotion. It’s incredibly difficult to take that time out of everything else that you have to do for your career and keep up with blogging/twitter/facebook, etc. Integration is the key to not losing your mind. 🙂

Michael – I don’t disagree with you about long term visability, but in the current age of technology not only will the information that the model posts be there forever, with pirating sites, so will his work. The decision to expose your body and perform intensely private acts for the entertainment of a large audience cannot be an easy one. Even without the use of your real name, your body and your face will still be recognizable. It’s a decision that these guys will have to live with for the rest of their lives no matter what they may choose to blog or tweet.

I’m glad you enjoyed the piece – and Michael, being rude to your fans is actually the topic of my last post coming soon. 🙂

3 Michael Australia { 01.07.11 at 9:27 pm }

While I 100% agree, one point I would add is the decision to present material must be thought about in terms of long-term reputation. We are a hypocritical society – we want penises and people to be available for sex, yet use that power in the name of so called decency to destroy someone’s reputation, once a whore always a whore. As you posted once I think don’t get into this if you want to be in congress.

Also, I would add unless you are some shock jock, do not be rude to your blog posters.

4 Devon { 01.08.11 at 10:56 pm }

I am happy to say that I have done most or all of this (or at least my web host friend has), and that everything in this piece is spot on. 🙂

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